8 Powerful Ways to Mould Your Children Into Leaders

By Dr. Travis Bradberry|20-05-2016 | 1 Min Read
Children are the Future Leaders

We all want our children to become leaders. Whether they spend the bulk of their days in the mailroom or at the corner of the office, we want our children to grow to be courageous, passionate and authentic. We want their actions to inspire other people to be their best, to get more out of life than they ever thought possible.

As parents and caretakers of children, their path to leadership is in our hands. We can model and teach the skills that will equip them to lead themselves and others in this hypercompetitive world, or we can allow them to fall victim to the kind of thinking that makes them slaves to the status quo.

It’s a big responsibility—but when isn’t being a parent a massive responsibility? The beauty of building children into leaders is that it’s the little things we do every day that mould them into the people they’ll become. Focus on the eight actions below, and you’ll build leadership in your children and yourself.

#1 Model emotional intelligence (EQ)

Emotional intelligence is that “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible; it affects how we manage behaviour, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions that achieve positive results. Children learn emotional intelligence from their parents, plain and simple. As your children watch you every day, they absorb your behaviour like a sponge. Children are particularly attuned to your awareness of emotions, the behaviour you demonstrate in response to strong emotions, and how you react and respond to their emotions.

#2 Don’t obsess about achievement

Parents get sucked into obsessing about achievement because they believe that this will turn their children into high achievers. Instead, fixating on achievement creates all sorts of problems for kids. This is especially true when it comes to leadership, where focusing on individual achievement gives kids the wrong idea about how work gets done.

Simply put, the best leaders surround themselves with great people because they know they can’t do it alone. Achievement-obsessed children are so focused on awards and outcomes that they never fully understand this. All they can see is the player who’s handed the MVP (Most Valuable Player) trophy and the celebrity chief executive officer who makes the news—they assume it’s all about the individual. It’s a rude awakening once they discover how real life works.

#3 Don’t praise too much

Children need praise to build a healthy sense of self-esteem. Unfortunately, piling on the praise doesn’t give them extra self-esteem. Children need to believe in themselves and develop the self-confidence required to become successful leaders, but if you gush every time they put pen to paper or kick a ball (the “everyone gets a trophy” mentality), this creates confusion and false confidence. Always show your children how proud you are of their passion and effort; just don’t paint them as superstars when you know it isn’t true.

#4 Allow them to experience risk and failure

Success in business and in life is driven by risk. When parents go overboard protecting their children, they don’t allow them to take risks and reap the consequences. When you aren’t allowed to fail, you don’t understand risk. A leader can’t take appropriate risks until he or she knows the bitter taste of failure that comes with risking it all and coming up short.

The road to success is paved with failure. When you try to shield your children from failure in order to boost their self-esteem, they have trouble tolerating the failure required to succeed as a leader. Don’t rub their face in it either. Children need your support when they fail. They need to know you care. They need to know that you know how much failure stings. Your support allows them to embrace the intensity of the experience and to know that they’ll make it through it all right. That, right there, is solid character building for future leaders.

#5 Say ‘No’

Overindulging children is a sure-fire way to limit their development as leaders. To succeed as a leader, one must be able to delay gratification and work hard for things that are really important. Children need to develop this patience. They need to set goals and experience the joy that comes with working diligently towards them. Saying “no” to your children will disappoint them momentarily, but they’ll get over that. They’ll never get over being spoilt.

#6 Let children solve their own problems

There’s certain self-sufficiency that comes with being a leader. When you’re the one making the calls, you should also be the one who needs to stay behind and clean up the mess they create.

When parents constantly solve their children’s problems for them, children never develop the critical ability to stand on their own two feet. Children who always have someone swooping in to rescue them and clean up their mess spend their whole lives waiting for this to happen. Leaders take action. They take charge. They’re responsible and accountable. Make certain your children are as well.

#7 Walk your talk

Authentic leaders are transparent and forthcoming. They aren’t perfect, but they earn people’s respect by walking their talk. Your children can develop this quality naturally, but only if it’s something they see you demonstrate. To be authentic, you must be honest in all things—not just in what you say and do but also in who you are. When you walk your talk, your words and actions will align with who you claim to be. Your children will see this and aspire to do the same.

#8 Show that you’re human

No matter how indignant and defiant your children are at any moment, you’re still their hero and their model for the future. This can make you want to hide your past mistakes for fear that they’ll be enticed to repeat them. The opposite is true. When you don’t show any vulnerability, your children develop intense guilt about every failure because they believe that they’re the only ones to make such terrible mistakes.

To develop as leaders, children need to know that the people they look up to aren’t infallible. Leaders must be able to process their mistakes, learn from them and move forward to be better people. Children can’t do this when they’re overcome by guilt. They need someone—a real, vulnerable person—to teach them how to process mistakes and learn from them. When you show them how you’ve done this in the past, you’re doing just that.

Bringing it all together

We can mould our children into leaders, but only if we work at it. Few things in life are as worth your time and effort as this.

Continue your journey with us by checking out the recorded live below on Overcoming Failures by Roshan Thiran; Founder and CEO of Leaderonomics, Social Entrepreneur, Key-note Speaker, and Leadership Author. In the live video, Roshan shares the importance of allowing ourselves to go through the grieving process when we fail.

Enjoyed our article? Do you desire to accelerate your growth? Look no further. Necole is a state-of-the-art learning platform that curates personalised learning just for you. To find out more about Necole, click here or email info@leaderonomics.com.

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Tags: Foundational Leadership

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world’s leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies. His bestselling books have been translated into 25 languages and are available in more than 150 countries. He has written for, or been covered by, Newsweek, TIME, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and The Harvard Business Review.
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