How To Command Respect If You’re Quiet

By Shashi Kesavan |08-10-2021 | 12 Min Video
Gaining Respect and the Attention of the People You Are Talking To

Someone quiet or shy, is usually referred to as meek and someone who lacks confidence. But that doesn't need to be the case. In fact, you can be quiet while still radiating massive confidence and commanding respect from the people around you. But how do you do that? What are ways for more introverted and quiet people to gain respect and command the attention of the people you speak to?

In this video, we’ll go through 4 tricks you can use to be charismatic without needing to be loud or over the top.


⏰TIMESTAMPS⏰

0:00 - Intro.
1:23 - #1: Use hand signals to capture attention.
4:49 - #2: Share praise to others.
6:50 - #3: Use your body language.
8:01 - #4: Be non-reactive.

This video is courtesy of Charisma University

You can also get access to more amazing videos via Necole. Necole is a state of the art learning platform that curates personalised learning just for you. To find out more about necole, click here or email info@leaderonomics.com

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Shashi Kesavan is a leader at Leaderonomics and has great expertise in the media space. He is currently the Director of Special Projects and is leading the deployment of the Global Internship programme. In his spare time, Shashi plays football and runs to let off steam. He is currently producing a number of podcast shows.
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