Take A Break And See Your Career Bloom!

By Eva Christodoulou|23-11-2014 | 4 Min Read
Allocate Some Time For a Break

Focusing on just relaxing or spending time with our loved ones can prove to be a great way to recharge our batteries and prepare for what lies ahead.

The holiday season is here. And many of us still struggle to balance the scales this time of the year.

On the one hand, the end of the year is near, and many are rushing to finish work. On the other hand, the holiday season calls for more time to be spent with the family, loved ones, and on giving back to the community.

Hopefully most of us have planned our time well and have the luxury of taking some time off around this time of the year.

So, if possible, take a break, and see how it can benefit your career as well. There is a reason why many companies do not allow their employees to carry forward leave from one year to the next. This is not because they are stingy.

On the contrary, it is because they understand the value of their employees taking time off work to rejuvenate.

Statistics show that employees that take breaks feel more refreshed, motivated, and committed to their organisation. It is therefore beneficial for the individual and also for the organisation to take time off and rejuvenate oneself, in order to boost productivity.

Recharge

Taking time off – whether it is for a week or an extended weekend. As long as we do not leave unfinished business back in the office that would cause us to stress even during our holiday, taking some time off work and switching off, focusing on just relaxing or spending time with our loved ones can prove to be a great way to recharge our batteries and prepare for what lies ahead.

Gain perspective

A break from work can give us the time to stop focussing on the daily tasks of our career and instead think of the bigger picture. Whether that is to recalibrate expectations, assess our own progress and development, or to shift our priorities altogether in career and in life, it is a necessary task to undertake once in a while, so that we do not disassociate from our own aims and values.

Taking a break and allocating some time to really think about issues like this can really add meaning to our daily tasks – either by substantiating our choices and actions, or by urging us to shift a bit and follow what we should really be doing.

It is a great way of making sure we are committed and motivated in our chosen career.

Make major changes

Before making any major changes in our career, it is always crucial to take some time to think about our next steps carefully. A break that would allow us the time to gain perspective, as mentioned above, can ensure that any decision for a change that we make is well-informed and strategically planned. Without taking the time to think about such a change carefully, we might make the wrong choice and end up in an even worse situation that we are currently in.

Get social

In this day and age, especially here in Malaysia, with people working long hours and communicating mostly though devices, it is important to find the time to reconnect with people.

Take advantage of the festive season and spend as much time as possible with family and loved ones as well as with friends, old and new. The interaction with them will give you fresh perspectives on your career, not to mention the pleasures that face-to-face interaction with people that are close to your heart brings.

Even better, make sure you mix with new people at the different open houses and parties that you attend.
There is nothing that beats human interaction and a personal touch, so make the most out of this period. You don’t need to be thinking of career opportunities all the while! Relax and enjoy yourself.

Pamper yourself

It may seem that taking time off does not really allow you too much time to relax, with all the thinking and the social interactions you need to do. Above all, you should take some time to relax, pamper yourself, and enjoy some peace and quiet.

Turn over a new leaf

It is easy to slip into our old habits after taking a break, refusing to make any changes that we so proudly drafted as our new-year resolutions. However, do try your best this time around to stick to the promises you made to yourself and incorporate changes in your professional as well as your personal life.

If you have already planned how you want to improve your professional life, go ahead and put your plans into action in order to enforce positive changes. If you decided on a career change, you’d better get down to it.

There is much that you need to do. Make sure you network with the right people, do your research, and make the right choice depending on your circumstances. If you are in your current job, ensure that you identify what you need to do to enhance your skills and development, to see progress and career satisfaction.

This holiday season, make sure you make the most of your time and you will see how your career can truly benefit from a refreshed, and newly-motivated you.

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Eva was formerly the Research & Development leader at Leaderonomics. Prior to that, she was an editor at Leaderonomics.com. Today, she is the Product leader of Happily, an engagement app at Leaderonomics Digital. She believes that everyone can be the leader they would like to be, if they are willing to put in the effort and are curious to learn along the way, as well as with some help from the people around them.
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