The No.1 Hot Weather Brain Drink

By Leaderonomics|17-10-2013 | 1 Min Read

mystarjob@leaderonomics.com

Is there such a thing as memory in a cup? Yes there is.

The next time you are experiencing “brain fog”, brew yourself a refreshing glass of iced green tea. It is a cognitive boosting brew and it’s my No. 1 choice for a drink in hot weather.

Neuroscientists aren’t exactly sure why green tea is so good for your brain, but it may have something to do with the extra L-theanine.

This compound seems to jump start the areas of your brain responsible for attention and memory. And who couldn’t use more of these?

Make sure you brew your own, though. Commercial ice teas don’t seem to produce the same benefit. You get one brain, so be kind to it.

Tea has other amazing benefits going for it as well. Well, what are you waiting for… start brewing!

Congratulations on learning something about your brain today. The Brain Bulletin is committed to help to do just that.

Always remember: “You are a genius!”

Enjoy your brain.

Terry Small is a brain expert who resides in Canada and believes that anyone can learn how to learn easier, better, faster, and that learning to learn is the most important skill a person can acquire. To interact with Small, email mystarjob@leaderonomics.com Click here for more brain bulletins. 

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