Puncak Harapan: Ain’t No Mountain High Enough To Reach Hope

By Bharat Avalani|10-05-2017 | 1 Min Read

LDR-PDF-download-110x110

My newfound friend Datin Veronica Selvanayagy invited me on the eve of Wesak Day to a charity event that her husband Datuk Dr Arunan Selvaraj had organised.

Her text invitation to me was:

“My husband took 4 mentally challenged children from Selangor Mental Health Association to climb Mount Kinabalu on April 25, and this event is to celebrate the successful completion of the climb.”

Personally, I have attended many a charity event but this particular one will forever be etched in my heart and memory.

 

Summit of hope

The Puncak Harapan (translated as ‘Hope Peak’ in English) project was a trek to Mount Kinabalu and aimed to aid the Selangor and Federal Territory Association for the Mentally Handicapped (SAMH). SAMH is a non-profit charitable organisation established in 1964, serving approximately 340 mentally challenged children and adults, ranging from the tender ages of three to matured 50-year-olds.

The project was executed by the Rainbow team, which encompassed of 14 enthusiastic climbers, including the participation of four students and two teachers from the SAMH, led by Dr Arunan.

The larger purpose was to fulfil the dream of the four boys who have longed to climb Mount Kinabalu in Sabah, the highest mountain in the Malay Archipelago.

 

Lessons on true grit

The story of Siah Juan Kit, a spastic, is a lesson in determination and perseverance. The climb was not easy for Siah because of his physical condition.

Siah Juan Kit

Siah in tears.

Siah would lose his balance and fall every 10–15 steps because of the uneven terrain. He was bruised physically but none of that quenched his inner spirit. Rather, he was happy each time he completed a step or when he got up after a fall.

At one time, it was raining at Layang Layang camp and the trail became very slippery. Siah could not pull the rope with his left hand. Cikgu Nazrin, one of the SAMH teachers, had to tell him the hard truth to abandon the climb at the fourth station. In tears, Siah reluctantly made the descent to the second station with some members of the team and guides.

His sadness and disappointment touched the hearts of the rangers, the guides and the Bomba brigade, i.e. the fire fighters who were waiting as Siah descended.

Siah was headstrong and determined to finish the climb, no matter what it takes. After a time of resting, Siah climbed up again from the second station to the sixth station.

Guess what? Siah managed to reach Laban Rata at 10:39 pm! That’s about four hours later than it usually takes.

 
Watch this video chronicling the journey:

 
See also: Leadership Nuggets: Achieving The Impossible With Jamie Andrew

 

Something for you to ponder

Climbing a mountain in itself is a huge challenge, but helping four mentally challenged and specially-abled students to fulfil their dream by guiding, training and overcoming obstacles along the way, in my humble opinion, is a climb to nobility and greatness.

At work, have you helped someone to overcome their limitations and unleash their potential? Have you experienced joy when someone you helped succeeds?

 

Share your ‘ascending and descending Mount Kinabalu’ moments with us at editor@leaderonomics.com, as we would love to hear your story of grit and tenacity. Bharat is a faculty trainer with Leaderonomics and to engage him for your organisational business storytelling needs, email us at training@leaderonomics.com. For more such stories, click here.

Share This

Leadership

Bharat is a faculty of Leaderonomics who specialises in creating brand experiences through storytelling. He is a veteran FMCG marketer and a memory collector too. He helps executive teams put stories to work by helping leaders find and tell business stories to engage, influence and inspire people.
Alt
Leaderonomics Logo

Wow, you scrolled all the way to the bottom! You must really like us.

Since you’re here, we’d like to ask you to consider donating to the maintenance and upkeep of our site, which as it turns out is pretty expensive.

Many do not have access to the resources needed to bring out their full leadership potential. That is why our content will always be free, and we would be forever grateful to those who help make that possible.

Earn your one-way ticket to heaven.

© 2022 Leaderonomics Sdn. Bhd. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed on this website are those of the writers or the people they quoted and not necessarily those of Leaderonomics.